Posts belonging to Category MASE



Nuclear Free Zone Declaration for Northwest New Mexico/Grants Uranium Belt

NUCLEAR FREE ZONE DECLARATION

for Northwest New Mexico/Grants Uranium Belt

Uranium mining and milling activities in the Grants Uranium Belt of New Mexico form a critical link in the nuclear fuel chain that supplies nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons development. Radioactivity is released at every stage in the nuclear fuel chain, including uranium mining and milling.

The 1872 Mining Act, originally created to help small miners has become a form of corporate welfare, and has turned cultural landscapes throughout the United States into National Sacrifice Areas, where local communities have been disregarded and the need for ongoing reclamation has resulted in a legacy of contaminated air, water and soil.

Legacy contamination from historic mining and milling in the Grants Mining District has not been completely assessed, nor has the region has been restored to pre-mining and milling conditions.

Whereas: Uranium legacy contamination poisons our water, land, and lives through ongoing radioactive releases that will continue to plague our cultural landscape and future generations,

There are better job opportunities for local populations in cleaning up the existing legacy of contamination and exploring alternative energy economies,

A 2011 National Academy of Science report has made it clear that there is no “safe level” of human exposure to radiation,

Past and present generations residing in the Grants Mining District have been disproportionately affected by uranium mining and milling activities that went unregulated for at least two decades,

Aquifers and waterways contaminated by uranium mining and milling can never be fully restored to pre-mining and milling conditions,

The continued removal of uranium from regional aquifers will result in a permanent loss of water from these deep water sources,

Renewed uranium mining in the Grants Uranium Belt will jeopardize the public health, natural ecosystems, and traditional cultural landscapes by further degrading our air and water quality,

The toxic waste generated from new uranium mining and milling will create an additional legacy for future generations,

Uranium mining violates our basic human rights to a clean and usable water supply, endangers our many traditional cultures, the public health, and interferes with the natural cycles of Earth and Water.

We are committed to protect and restore our shared water resources that are so critical to our continued survival in an arid desert environment, our quality of life, and multi-cultural preservation,

Therefore: We, the undersigned, join a growing global movement to limit the use of nuclear power and transform National Sacrifice Areas into Nuclear Free Zones.

We endorse the development of renewable energy sources that sustain- not destroy- our public lands, multi-cultural landscapes, and natural ecosystems.

We will provide direction to our lawmakers and private industry to invest in renewable, clean energy that conserves and protects our forests, watersheds and cultures.

We further encourage investment and job creation in the cleanup of the historic uranium legacy contamination that still exists within our shared watersheds.

We further urge all federal and state regulatory agencies to promote the right to a clean, sustainable water sources within their jurisdictions as an element of their public trust to further the best interests of the public welfare, including those poor, minority populations already overburdened by legacy contamination from uranium mining and milling in the Grants Mining District.

We urge the United States Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and New Mexico Mining and Minerals Division not to approve any new mining plans of operation on public lands in New Mexico until the complete reclamation of ground water, soil, and air contamination from historic uranium mining in the Grants Mining District is fully achieved.

In Conclusion, We, the undersigned, pledge to work in solidarity with all people who wish to break free of their nuclear fuel chains and dependency on non-renewable, polluting sources of energy and move towards the development of renewable and sustainable energy that does not threaten the public health, public water supplies, or our special landscapes.

Adopted by Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment on October 12, 2012.

Click here to download a pdf of the Declaration:  NFZ Declaration.final

 

March 15 Film Festival in Grants

CONNECTIONS AND CONSEQUENCES:

Think OUTside the Mine

A documentary film festival on energy, and the health 

and environmental consequences of uranium mining and milling, 

oil and gas production, and nuclear disasters and waste management

Saturday, March 15 from 10 am to 3 pm

New Mexico State University Campus Theater

500 N 3rd Street, Grants, NM

10-11 am Nuclear Aftershock  (2012, 55 minutes) Frontline Film

…..Could a Fukushima-like disaster happen to us? March 11 marks the third anniversary

of the earthquake, the tsunami, and nuclear disaster in Japan.

Discussion leaders: 

Susan Gordon, Coordinator, Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment

Activist for nuclear clean-up and health issues for 17 years

Scott Kovac, Operations and Research Director, Nuclear Watch New Mexico

Focus on clean-up issues at Los Alamos National Lab and WIPP for 10 years

12 pm Split Estate  (2009, 76 minutes) Bullfrog Films

…..Imagine that while you own the land, you don’t own the mineral rights beneath

your home and a mining company will drill for natural gas 200 feet from your front door.

1:30-3 pm Tailings  (2012, 12 minutes) Sam Price-Waldman Film

….Just outside Grants, New Mexico, is a toxic heap of uranium tailings sitting

for 30 years contaminating the air and water.

Discussion, Testimony, and Updates:

Bluewater Valley Downstream Alliance

Eastern Navajo Dine Against Uranium Mining

Southwest Research and Information Center

….And friends of MASE

Sponsored by the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment 

Organized by the Laguna-Acoma Coalition for a Safe Environment 

For more information email: clowery@earthlink.net

 

SIGN OUR PETITION: Do not start uranium mining on Mt. Taylor

To be delivered to: Joe Norrell, Acting Forest Supervisor, U.S. Forest Service

PETITION STATEMENT: I urge you to protect New Mexico’s environment and public health by opposing the Roca Honda uranium mine on Mt. Taylor. Please choose the “No Action” Alternative in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

PETITION BACKGROUND:For the first time in 30 years, New Mexico may open its doors to uranium mining. Uranium mining can cause permanent damage to our water supplies through the leaching of radioactive materials into groundwater, not to mention the fact that it takes millions of gallons of water a day to operate a mine. Worse yet—they want to mine on Mt. Taylor, a mountain sacred to the Navajo and Pueblos and the highest point in the Cibola National Forest. Allowing mining anywhere near the mountain would be devastating.Please sign the petition below and show the U.S. Forest Service that New Mexicans do not want this type of destruction in our state. Public comments are open until May 14.

Sign the petition at: http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/do-not-start-uranium.fb28?source=s.fb.ty&r_by=1259323.

PRESS RELEASE: No Uranium Mining in Churchrock, New Mexico Until Legacy Waste Is Cleaned Up

Larry J. King, ENDAUM Board member, stands at his gate and points out the area of in Churchrock, NM known as Section 8 where Hydro Resources (a subsidiary of Uranium Resources Inc.) plans to mine uranium using in situ leach methods. 
Photo by Leona Morgan

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, July 23, 2012

NO URANIUM MINING IN CHURCHROCK, NEW MEXICO
UNTIL LEGACY WASTE IS CLEANED UP

CHURCHROCK, N.M. — On July 19, 2012, the uranium mining company Hydro Resources Inc. signed an agreement with the Navajo Nation giving the mining company limited access across Navajo Indian Country to its Churchrock Section 8 mine site. The agreement specifically states that Hydro Resources (a subsidiary of Uranium Resources Inc.) cannot begin mining uranium until legacy waste at Section 8 and adjacent Section 17 has been cleaned up.
Hydro Resources announced its intention to mine uranium on Section 8 and Section 17 in 1994. Community members organized themselves as the Eastern Navajo Diné Against Uranium Mining (ENDAUM) and sought the help of the nonprofit law firm New Mexico Environmental Law Center to keep irresponsible uranium mining from returning to Navajo lands. ENDAUM has kept the fight going for over a decade and Hydro Resources has yet to break ground.

ENDAUM’s mission is to ensure that the water, air, land and community health are protected. Leona Morgan, ENDAUM Coordinator explains, “ENDAUM believes it is our right as Indigenous Peoples to preserve our traditional and cultural Diné resources that may be affected if uranium mining is allowed anywhere within the Four Sacred Mountains or on other Indigenous Peoples’ homelands. ENDAUM and our allies will continue to fight for the right to safe drinking water supplies for all life, for all our relations and future generations,” says Morgan.

“Hydro Resources’ parent company, Uranium Resources Inc., is struggling to pay for clean-up at its uranium operations in Texas,” says Eric Jantz, attorney for ENDAUM. “We’re skeptical that Hydro Resources will be able to pay for clean-up at Church Rock. In any event, ENDAUM and the people of Church Rock will be watching Hydro Resources and the Navajo Nation to ensure that their land and families are protected.”

The Navajo Nation fined Hydro Resources for trespass earlier this year when the company crossed tribal trust land in order to access its property on Section 8. The agreement was made to allow Hydro Resources limited access to Section 8 and require that Hydro Resources submit to Navajo Nation jurisdiction for its operations in Indian Country as well as clean up the radioactive waste on its property before any new mining commences.

“The Navajo Nation doesn’t currently have clean-up regulations under its Superfund law — those regulations will have to be written,” says Morgan. “ENDAUM will be engaged in this process to ensure that the highest clean-up standards are adopted to protect the community.”

Interviews and Images Available Upon Request

CONTACTS:

Leona Morgan
Coordinator
Eastern Navajo Diné Against Uranium Mining
leona@endaum.com

Eric Jantz
Staff Attorney
New Mexico Environmental Law Center
ejantz@nmelc.org

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

http://nmenvirolaw.org/index.php/site/cases/hydro_resources_inc._uranium_mines/

###

Additional Online Resources:

 

Navajo Nation & HRI Agreement

Fully Executed Temporary Access Agreement, Signed July 19, 2012

Navajo Nation Laws

Radioactive and Related Substances, Equipment, Vehicles, Persons, and Materials Transportation Act of 2012

Diné Natural Resources Protection Act of 2005

Laramide Receives Draft EIS & Updates Permitting Status for La Jara Mesa Project

TORONTO, May 22, 2012 /CNW/ – Laramide Resources Ltd. (“Laramide” or the “Company”) is pleased to provide the following update to shareholders on the permitting status of the La Jara Mesa project in Grants, New Mexico. On May 18, 2012, the U.S. Forest Service (“USFS”) issued a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (“DEIS”) for the Company’s La Jara Mesa uranium project. The issuance of the DEIS represents a significant milestone in the mine permit process, which would allow underground development activities and mine production at the La Jara Mesa project.

With the completion of this stage of USFS’s review and notice of availability of the DEIS published in the Federal Register, there will now be a public review of the DEIS for a 60 day comment period ending 17 July 2012. Progress will continue with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review process of La Jara Mesa, which will ultimately lead to the completion of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision (ROD) expected later this year.

A copy of the DEIS can be found at Laramide’s website (www.laramide.com or through the following link: http://www.fs.fed.us/nepa/nepa_project_exp.php?project=25654

Permitting Process to Date

To initiate and support the permitting process, Laramide submitted a Plan of Operations for the La Jara Mesa Project to the USFS in April of 2008 for underground development and mine production. As a result of the Plan of Operations, the USFS determined the need for an Environmental Impact Statement, which has been ongoing since May of 2009. The Plan of Operation is also available on the Company’s website. It is important to note that Homestake Mining Company (“Homestake”) had a similar Plan of Operations for the La Jara Mesa project reviewed and approved by the USFS in 1984 and 1988. In both cases, Homestake chose not to enter into production because of steep declines in the price of uranium.

La Jara Mesa Overview

La Jara Mesa project is located in the prolific Grants Mineral Belt, 10 miles northeast of the town of Grants in Cibola County, New Mexico, USA.  La Jara Mesa is a sandstone hosted roll-front style deposit with an NI 43-101 compliant mineral resource estimate with a Measured and Indicated mineral resources totaling 7,257,817 pounds of uranium (U3O8) that are contained in 1,555,899 tons at an average grade of 0.23% U3O8, and an additional 3,172,653 pounds of U3O8 contained in 793,161 tons at an average grade of 0.20% U3O8 as Inferred mineral resources on the property. Considerable historic uranium exploration activity has been completed on La Jara Mesa by companies such as United Nuclear Corporation, Gulf Resources and Homestake. These companies performed exploration work, comprising of over 700 drill holes as well as metallurgical test work. Historical metallurgical studies on La Jara Mesa exhibited strong recoveries and potential underground access is quite straightforward via an inclined ramp from the valley floor. The Company also believes the project has additional exploration potential to expand current mineral resources. The resource lies approximately 700 feet below the surface and approximately 500 to 800 feet above the water table.

To learn more about Laramide, please visit the Company’s website at www.laramide.com.

The technical information in this news release has been prepared in accordance with the Canadian regulatory requirements set out in NI 43-101 and reviewed by Peter Mullens, Vice President of Exploration, Laramide Resources Ltd., a qualified person under NI 43-101 guidelines.

via LARAMIDE RESOURCES LTD. | Laramide Receives Draft EIS and Updates Permitting Status for La Jara Mesa Project.